Arts & Entertainment

New Works: Gisela Colon & Patrick Wilson

By Jeff Davis

Gisela Colon: New Sculpture, is on exhibit at Diane Rosenstein Gallery through March 3rd, 2018. In addition the artist’s wall mounted blow-molded acrylic pods the show also presents two of her gigantic parabolic monoliths towering 12 and 15 feet high respectively and a large freestanding rectangular monolith.

The pods or “Non-Specific Objects” are an evolution in Colon’s continuing series. They are expertly formed organic or biomorphic shaped objects, showing no seams or source of access. The asymmetric shapes are coated on the inside with acrylic layers that reflect and refract light that enters emitting a range a prismatic colors including shades of green, blue, fuchsia and metallic hues. They pulsate light and energy. The pods definitely give off a science fiction vibe that Ridley Scott would do well to utilize in his next Alien franchise. What is really inside?

Skewed Square (Aqua Gold), 2017, Blow-molded acrylic, 54”x 41”x 12” – Courtesy photo

The two giant parabolic Monoliths that dominate the gallery space look like they too have come from another realm. One can’t help being reminded of 2016’s Arrival. Unlike the pods, the monoliths are sculpted out of an iridescent carbon fiber using aerospace technology. No light radiates from their interior, rather they reflect the energy and light around them, giving no clue to what is hidden inside. Colon thinks of them as totems such as Stonehenge or the Great Pyramids, reminiscent of ancient cultural objects.

Untitled (Parabolic Monolith Titanium), 2017, Engineered aerospace composite, 180” x 62.5” x 37.5”, – Courtesy photo / Jeffrey Davis

Last but not least there is the freestanding light slab, perhaps a reference to 2001 A Space Odyssey if we keep with the movie themes or a nod to John McCracken and/or DeWain Valentine. Unlike the Non-Specific Objects and parabolic monoliths, all the seams show in this construction. The sides of the object are held together with mirror-polished steel and visible screws. It could be a door to an alternate universe or perhaps something is entombed inside. As with all of her works, the hues change depending on the lighting and your perspective.

Light Slab, 2017, Molded acrylic and polished stainless steel, 96” x 38” x 14”, – Courtesy photo / Jeffrey Davis

Colon doesn’t provide a specific explanation of what each of the works represents, rather she leaves it up to the individual to interpret as they like. If you enjoy the work of artist like Robert Irwin, Donald Judd, Craig Kauffman and the Light and Space Movement in general then this will tickle your fancy.

While Colon’s sculptures have obvious dimensionality, Patrick Wilson’s new paintings showing at Susanne Vielmetter LA Projects  in Culver City (through March 3rd) create a sense of depth even though they are painted on super flat canvases. The works are made by using a drywall blade to squeegee layer after layer of overlapping squares and rectangles onto the surface. Not a single curved line inhabits their space.

Patrick Wilson, On the Patio, Acrylic on canvas, 67” x 72”, – Courtesy photo / Robert Wedemeyer

The works are pristine, exact, no signs of the blade marks or brush strokes. The perfect edges are created using tape, but again, precision execution as if produced using a laser printer. Up to 10 layers or more of paint color in a fraction of a millimeter. The overlapping shapes and right angles create both a sculptural and architectural feel to the works. Although he uses only paint, the works appear to utilize sheets of frosted glass, acrylic tiles or other materials to create a sense of levels.

Patrick Wilson, Bar Menu, 2017, Acrylic on canvas, 67” x 72”, – Courtesy photo / Robert Wedemeyer

Wilson places cool greys and blues next to hot reds, oranges and yellows; browns and mustards next to Kelly greens and almost florescent reds. Colors that shouldn’t work together blend with ease. Some sections are solid color fields while other subtly bleed through creating areas of transparency, sheerness or opacity. Like Colon’s work the paintings have a luminosity created by the light bouncing off their exterior.

Wilson’s work builds easily on the Light and Space artist of the west coast such Robert Irwin and John McLaughlin as well as the hard-edge paintings of Frederick Hammersley and Karl Benjamin. He is a master of color and light.

Patrick Wilson, Storm Swell, Acrylic on Canvas, 67” x 72”, – Courtesy photo / Robert Wedemeyer

Gallery Captions:

Skewed Square (Aqua Gold), 2017, Blow-molded acrylic, 54” x 41” x 12”

Patrick Wilson, Bar Menu, 2017, Acrylic on canvas, 67” x 72”, Photo credit: Robert Wedemeyer

Patrick Wilson, On the Patio, Acrylic on canvas, 67” x 72”, Photo credit: Robert Wedemeyer

Patrick Wilson, Storm Swell, Acrylic on Canvas, 67” x 72”, Photo credit: Robert Wedemeyer

Untitled (Parabolic Monolith Titanium), 2017, Engineered aerospace composite, 180” x  62.5” x 37.5”, Photo by Jeffrey Davis

Light Slab, 2017, Molded acrylic and polished stainless steel, 96” x 38” x 14”, Photo by Jeffrey Davis

February 21, 2018

About Author

Jeff Davis Jeff Davis is an artist with a studio at the Hawthorne Art Complex. He writes a monthly column for Beacon Media publications as well as collecting and investing in art and other asset classes. Mr. Davis has a BS in Economics from the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School and an MBA from the University of Chicago. He grew up in Golden Valley, Minnesota and has lived in New York, Chicago, Philadelphia and currently resides in Los Angeles. Please contact Mr. Davis at his website www.davisphere.com or through Beacon Media if you would like c.overage of a local art event or exhibit.


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